Dropping the Pan, Cleaning, Painting

Posted: April 28, 2013 in Uncategorized
Before Shot ---- lots of brownie like sludge..

Before Shot —- lots of brownie like sludge..

Easy Off In Action

Easy Off In Action

Easy Off works great

Easy Off works great

Plenty of soap, water, sos pads

Plenty of soap, water, sos pads

Last night I removed the oil pan last night and today I cleaned and painted the pan.Let’s talk a little about removing the pan. It wasn’t so bad. I did a few things to make the job easier. I set up a small jack with a big piece of packaging foam to “prop up” the pan so it wouldn’t drop. This worked really well. I didn’t want to bend the pan under its own weight when the bolts were down to the last few. The added benefit was that I could lower the pan SLOWLY and remove the oil pump without it falling into the pan.  I was also given the “hint” to turn the wheel all the way to the right or left so the tie rod would move out of the way.  If I didn’t do this, I wouldn’t have been able to remove the bolts in the front of the pan.

 

Cleaning and prepping the pan was a whole other story. This took nearly all day. First I let the pan drain a little into an aluminum tray. After clearing off the baffles, I wanted to remove the baffles. This wasn’t easy. There are two methods that seem to work for people. The first is to put the pan in a heavy plastic bag and SLAM it into the ground a few times. I tried this second… it didn’t work. It did wake a neighbor. The method that I started and ended with was using a lever in the hole and using my foot to expand the pan. This method isn’t as “easy” as folks claim. It took time. It eventually worked.

Then I scooped out the crud/sludge with cardboard and a scraper. I found TWO unused cotter pins — one was in the baffle the other was in the bottom of the pan. The amount of sludge was less than expected and there was no sign of any pieces of metal. This was great news. Oven Off outperformed the engine degreaser. Elbow grease was greatly required. I also used about 15 SOS pads. Cleaning the pan also revealed a surprise. Something that I thought was soft/spongy anti-rattle stripping where you bolt the underside of the pan was actually steel reinforcements under layers of sludge. I was shocked to see this.

 

 

After HOURS of cleaning the pan, I dried it, primed it, and applied two coats of 500 degree black engine enamel. I probably don’t need the engine enamel, but I figured that this might get hot so I might as well use it. I painted only the part that faces the road. The inside is now shiny metal (with lots of spotting). When I painted the pan, I removed the oil plug and put a bottle cap over the hole. I figure that you probably don’t want to get paint in this area. The pan is drying in the garage and should be fully cured by next week’s installation.

 

The goal now is to order a few more parts — the gasket for the oil pump and the gasket for the valve cover.  I was told that if I am dropping the pan, I should also clean the oil pump filter and clean the valve chamber.  Both look like they will require gaskets that I didn’t order the other week.

Unpainted Pan

Unpainted Pan

Painted Pan

Painted Pan

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Comments
  1. Pat Martone says:

    Seth,
    We’ve emailed each other before.
    I am a Minuteman Model A Ford Club of Massachusetts member.
    I am really enjoying reading about your efforts; keep up the good work and your documenting of it all too!
    Maybe I’ll see you at the New England meet at Cape Cod this September, or at another event.

  2. That would be great Pat.

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